Psychology tips to write effective cold emails

Email marketing is a digital twist on door-to-door. The whole idea may seem pointless and like a massive waste of time. After all, nobody likes unsolicited advertisements, right? Well, not exactly, as email marketing has the highest ROI rates of all marketing strategies. According to WordStream, every one pound spent on email marketing has an ROI of 38 pounds in the UK; in the US, it’s $44. To put it in simple terms: it generates the most money for the least effort.

Just like in real life, it’s not easy to get the attention of your potential customers or business partners and keep them engaged past the first sentence online. To achieve fruitful results and increase sales via email marketing you must be aware of certain psychological subtleties involved in it.

Good Deals Don’t Last Forever 

People love limited offers and sales as is patently evident by holidays like Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Some would have you believe that our consumerist culture is responsible for this, but this isn’t so. The reason why events like Black Friday are popular is rooted deep in our psychology; in large part, it’s due to a form of social anxiety called the fear of missing out that most people suffer from.

You can use FOMO to your advantage to generate more sales by creating scarcity and urgency through limited-time bonuses and discounts. This strategy works best with a target audience. If there was a good deal on an item, you don’t really need, you probably wouldn’t buy it anyway.

How to use FOMO?

Fortunately, FOMO has an answer for that, too. If you add some exclusivity to the mix, you may even attract parties outside your target market. Everyone wants to feel like a part of the VIP club and have something that no one else has.

Scarcity has been a staple in the marketing business for the longest time. It will never stop working as long as the human psyche remains the same.

Brevity Is Key 

People don’t usually have time to read a long sales pitch in the form of an essay in a business setting. For the sake of simplicity using sophisticated words is not recommended either, they put people off. Keep it concise and easy to understand, don’t try to sound smart. You’re offering services or selling a product, so you should speak like a salesman, not a philosophy professor.

It also wouldn’t hurt to have a look at cold email templates for ideas. Work out some guidelines based on other people’s emails so you can write yours following an organized structure. You don’t want to bore or confuse your recipients, nor make things readable and clear for them. This is an excellent way to create a mage of you as a business-oriented person in your potential clients’ head.

Don’t Hesitate to Outsource

Consider seeking the help of professionals in the event you need to write a lot of personalized cold emails and don’t have much time on your hands. Email copywriting is a science after all, so if you don’t have the time to study it, you can use academic writing services to hire a writer that has demonstrable experience and a long list of satisfied customers.

Market it to the person, then the company

Whoever receives your email is an individual, the same as you. They have feelings, ambitions, and desires. You want to appeal to them on a personal level using these things. Try to convince them that there’s something for them to get out of the deal if they take it to their superiors; perhaps a promotion or a bonus to their salary. Modern email sending tools like SmartrMail give you access to statistics and successful email templates to help you create personalized messages tailored to your target audience.

Your primary goal is to motivate the receiver to act upon fast decisions. Heresy has published an exhaustive article on the importance of stimulating emotions when writing cold emails. Slow decisions are taken after they’ve been pondered upon. While fast decisions are made based on emotion and previous experience.

How Do I Use That?

Here are some examples:

“It will help your company secure more lucrative future deals in this business sector.”

“This opportunity will increase your company’s productivity by 25% this quarter.”

“You can sell this exclusive product to your competitors at twice the rate we’re offering by the end of the week”

Sometimes one person, an ordinary employee answering emails, is all that stands between you and a closed deal. So it can be imperative to find the right approach to them. You need to understand that they’re probably swamped, and your email is but one among hundreds of others they’ve gone through today.

In Conclusion

Using people’s fear of missing out on a once-in-a-lifetime deal, you can drive your sales through the roof. Market your product as exclusive and limited, create a sense of scarcity.

You want to make an impression of a business-oriented and time-efficient person. This will help your potential partners take you seriously and consider your offer more carefully.

Find the right words and address the email to the person who will be reading it, not the company. Play on their career ambitions or devotion to the company.

About the author: Daniela McVicker is a professional writer and editor for Top Writers Review. She graduated from Durham University and has an MA in Psychological Science. Daniela has been applying her knowledge of psychology and marketing to help business owners improve the customer experience and relationships.

Get started image

Ready to get started?

Get the expert support you need

Start Now

Related Articles

Generate Web Site Traffic and Sales Leads with Postcards

by Bob Leduc, on July 20, 2022

How to Measure Social Media Effectiveness

by Dan Matthews, on July 20, 2022

Social Media Overload: Does your small business need to be on every network?

by Ellen Williams, Regional Development Director, Constant Contact, on July 20, 2022

Company Brand vs. Individual Brand: Which Way to Go?

by Johann Sebastian Siburian, on July 20, 2022

LinkedIn Dos And Don’ts

Dan Cook, on July 20, 2022

Do You Need a Customized Website, or Is Social Media Enough?

By John Pearson, on July 20, 2022