What Is the Owner of an LLC Called?

llc owner titles

LLC owners are known as “members.” But you’re not required to have a specific LLC owner title.

Instead, you can choose a title that characterizes your role and authority to make business decisions.

START YOUR LLC

Ready to form an LLC? Starts at $0 + state fees and only takes 5-10 mins

Excellent Trustpilot reviews 11,501 reviews Trustpilot reviews

When you form a limited liability company (LLC), you must meet the state’s requirements for naming your business. Even though the naming rules are strict, there isn’t a set LLC owner title. You can choose one that reflects your position in the company, and not everyone calls themselves “President” or “CEO.” Whatever you call yourself, you need the title of an LLC owner to sign legal documents and secure financing.

With so many options for LLC titles, you might want a little guidance. Our team has put together some suggestions to help you find a title that suits you and your company. When you’re ready, use our LLC Formation Services to start your LLC and get ongoing support for your business.

Official Titles for LLC Owners

State business laws refer to an LLC owner as an “LLC member.” Most states require an LLC to have at least one member. Thus, you can use the built-in tile of “member” if you run a single-member LLC. Because LLCs can have multiple members (a multi-member LLC), you may need to use distinct LLC position titles to:

  • Show lenders and business partners which owners have decision-making authority for the business
  • Assign each member’s internal responsibilities for day-to-day operations

Depending on the member’s management responsibilities, you might want to use different job titles for each owner.

LLC Members vs. Managers

Many LLC owners share responsibility for company operations and managerial decisions. An LLC where all members are in charge of business-related decisions is called a “member-managed LLC.” However, the LLC’s flexible business structure allows members to appoint a manager to run the day-to-day operations. If a manager handles daily operations, it’s a “manager-managed LLC.”

LLC managers can be members, but they don’t have to be. If you’re in charge of management responsibilities, some common business owner titles might be “managing member” or “member-manager.” However, a common title like this doesn’t convey to others that you hold the top-ranking position in the company.

LLC Owner Titles to Consider

Depending on your ownership structure, you could use traditional titles as LLC member names. Some choices for a single-member LLC title are “Owner,” “President,” or “CEO” (Chief Executive Officer).

For multi-member LLCs, you might use other corporate titles for LLC owners. These titles can include a COO (Chief Operating Officer) and CFO (Chief Financial Officer). Consider a CTO (Chief Technology Officer) or CIO (Chief Information Officer) title for technology-influenced industries.

Other Choices for LLC Owner Titles

  • Founder
  • Company president
  • Secretary
  • Technical director
  • Managing director
  • Creative director (especially in the design, fashion, and art industries)
  • Director of operations

Titles like owner or founder usually describe a small start-up company. Using more traditional titles in an LLC makes it sound like a larger company.

LLC Owner Titles to Use with Caution

You have leeway when choosing LLC titles for owners, but that doesn’t mean going all out. You might be tempted to use humorous titles or made-up titles, like “Supreme Commander” or “Chief Coordinator.” However, choosing a vague or inaccurate title can give the wrong impression to lenders, investors, and associates. Also, consider avoiding titles like “partner” or “managing partner” because they indicate a partnership, not an LLC.

Choosing a Title as an LLC Owner

When choosing LLC titles for your owners, it helps to have a strategy. Take some time to think about how you want to represent yourself and your business. Remember that you’re going to use your title in professional situations, like applying for loans, networking, and signing contracts. The title you use should convey your role in the company and your authority in making business decisions.

What is the best title for an LLC owner to use?

The best business titles for LLC owners depend on the image you want to project. You can give yourself whatever title you want as long as you’re not misrepresenting your qualifications. The most popular titles include Owner, President, and CEO. Still, you’re free to choose a different option to fit your business management style and structure.

Disclaimer: The content on this page is for informational purposes only, and doesn’t constitute legal, tax, or accounting advice. If you have specific questions about any of these topics, seek the counsel of a licensed professional.

LLC Owner FAQs

  • In most states, an LLC must have at least one member. There isn’t a limit on how many members you can have unless you want to qualify as an S-corp. In that case, you can have up to 100 members.

  • An LLC owner can use the CEO title, but they don’t have to. Each owner is called a member, though you can assign individual titles under the operating agreement terms.

  • No. The owners of an LLC are called members. Only business entities organized as corporations have shareholders.

  • The members can assign LLC officer titles, like CEO, President, CFO, or Secretary, if it fits the company structure. But they can use different or additional titles, as well.

  • An LLC is operated by its members or by an elected manager. The members may vote to have officers approve business decisions or use officer titles like CEO or COO.

  • Ordinarily, business decisions for LLCs are made by the owners (called “members”) or a manager elected by the members. The members can choose to have a Board of Directors if that option is present in their operating agreement.

  • At least one LLC organizer must sign the Articles of Organization or Certificate of Formation. In some states, the organizer must be over 18. If the LLC is member-managed, you’ll want all the members to sign to show their involvement in the business.